As within, so without.

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I’m involved in setting up a new organisation within the SEEDS ecosystem. ( I wrote about SEEDS last week, and it seems I succeeded in conveying my excitement, but may have lost some folks with the details. Fear not — I will be unpacking various aspects of SEEDS over the coming weeks, and hopefully all will become clear.) Initiating a new organisation — with its own unique culture — raises a lot of really interesting questions, including something I am really passionate about: the need for yin/yang balance.

This is something I have thought about a lot, and wrote about in my doctoral dissertation. When an organisation is setting out to generate social change, it is important that it should be the change it wants to see in the world. (Same goes for individuals setting out to generate change.) There has to be integrity between what it is saying and what it is doing, or it just doesn’t work. (See what I wrote about As Within, So Without, and my all-time favourite leadership story, about Christiana Figueres.) …


The start of my journey into the SEEDS cryptocurrency — our best bet for the more beautiful world we know is possible

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Regular readers will know that I have been nurturing a growing fascination with complementary currencies, and have written about the need for a new economic model many times in the past (like here, here, here, and here). So far it has all been fairly hypothetical and abstract, but now the rubber is about to hit the road in a way that I’m very excited about.

Last August I had a Zoom call (what else!) with Scott Morris, who I had first met at the Global Economic Visioning conference at Bretton Woods in 2018. Scott is an expert in local currencies, and I was telling him about my global women’s network, the Sisters, and my preliminary designs for a complementary currency, called the yin, to counterbalance our predominantly yang mainstream economy (inspired by Bernard Lietaer’s work, described in my blog post on Yin, Yang, and Jung). …


When some of us had more time to read than usual…

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Happy New Year to you! (Although if you’re in the US, it may not be so happy thus far — and you have my condolences, commiserations, and sympathy.)

I took a blissful two weeks (mostly) offline over my birthday (it’s not too late to wish me a happy one!), Christmas and New Year. Towards the middle of December I noticed I was feeling really tired, and realised I hadn’t had a holiday since sometime in 2019, and I’m not even sure I had one then. This is the mixed blessing of doing work I love — even though my work inspires and energises me, I still need a break occasionally. …


A year-long “learning opportunity”…

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This will be my last blog post of the year, and it’s hard to know what to say about 2020. I’m not going to give in to the glibness and gallows humour of “it’s all been terrible”, because I really believe that the hardest times are the greatest teachers.

But how to sum up in a few short words a year that has been dominated worldwide by the coronavirus, an invisible foe that has infected an estimated 74.2 million people worldwide, and been a factor in 1.65 million deaths? …


How to create predictable miracles

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A super-quick blog post today, heavily plagiarised from my doctoral dissertation, as I’m doing a full-time online course this week with the Presencing Institute. If you’re not familiar with Presencing, it’s a blended word formed from sensing (feeling the future possibility) and presence (the state of being in the present moment). It means sensing and actualizing one’s highest future possibility- acting from the presence of what is wanting to emerge.

If you think this all sounds a bit fluffy, you might be surprised to hear that it was founded by a German lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School of Management called Otto Scharmer. He co-founded the Presencing Institute in 2006, and in 2009 he and Katrin Kaufer published Theory U: Leading from the Future as It Emerges. Described as an “action research platform at the intersection of science, consciousness, and profound social and organizational change”, the Presencing Institute has had a significant and widespread impact on addressing global challenges such as the ecological crisis, inequality, finance, healthcare and education. …


If you think you’re living in the real world, you’re mostly mistaken.

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“If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, Infinite. For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thro’ narrow chinks of his cavern.” ― William Blake

If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you’ll know that I’m fascinated by, amongst other things, the nature of reality. It’s fairly uncontroversial to say that our perception of the world is shaped by our experiences, the survival imperative, and by the capabilities and limitations of human sensory organs ( see my notes on Deviate, by Beau Lotto, and Liminal Thinking, by Dave Gray). …


and the pros and cons of magic wands

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“And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it.”
― Roald Dahl

“Do you believe in magic?”

A friend asked me this question earlier this year, and my immediate response was that yes, I do believe in magic, in the sense that there are events, feelings, connections and coincidences that happen that we can’t explain. …


It’s not just the wheels on the bus that go round and round. It’s life.

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Seems we humans like to represent ideas as cycles, or spirals. In fact, even the things that at first appear to be cycles are really spirals — the seasons form a cycle, but winter 2021 will not be the same as winter 2020 (thank heavens, some might say…). Time moves on, so in the same way you can’t step in the same river twice, you can’t live through the same winter twice.

Here are a few cycles for your delectation, including one I made up myself. …


Regenerative reciprocity: a love story of Earth and humans

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Eco-warriors sometimes get exhausted. Often, it seems that there is too much bad news, and not enough good. And even the silver clouds, such as the election of an eco-sympathetic US president, can have dark linings.

So I’d like to share a book and a documentary that I have read and seen recently that cheered me up, and might offer balm to the battle-weary green soul.

I listened to the author, Robin Wall Kimmerer, reading the audiobook of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants. She reads as beautifully as she writes, and you can often hear the smile in her voice as she describes her favourite wonders of nature. …


When everything is going to hell, we still get to choose whether we are for peace, or against it.

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I drafted this blog post a while ago, and slated it for today. I have just re-read it, and given what is currently unfolding in the US, wondered if it felt relevant. I believe it is — and may even be more relevant than I could have dreamed.

I realise this message may not sit well with those caught up in the emotional drama of the US election — and I count myself among you. I spent most of yesterday in a simmering state of fury and frustration which I am finding it hard to pin down, but for now I would say it’s a combination of indignation that the process of democracy is being so egregiously assaulted, disgust for the individual who is the perpetrator of that assault (and assaults on so many other values that I hold dear), and concern for the future — for the safety of my American friends, for the environment, and for the rest of the world, because all of us will be affected to a greater or lesser degree, even in the best case scenario, and like Umair Haque and Van Jones, I’m not that optimistic about that scenario coming to pass. …

About

Roz Savage

Former management consultant who stepped out of the ordinary to row oceans solo. Currently writing at https://www.thegiftsofsolitude.com/ and www.rozsavage.com

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